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The Beehive Review – Blerta Başoli’s drama, which won the Sundance in Kosovo, brings an inspiring true life story to the Glasgow Film Festival

Yllka Gashi performs a subtle but powerful game in the already hung garlands of Beehives / Photo: Alexander Blum

Blerta Basoli’s drama, which won the Kosovo stage, brings an inspiring true story to the Glasgow Film Festival

Courage in the face of terrible difficulties fuels this humane and inspiring Albanian-Kosovo film by debut screenwriter-director Blerta Basholi, who is even more concerned with his authenticity and restraint. Telling the true story of a beautiful woman struggling with sexism in her hometown, Beehive attracted international attention when it won all three major prizes at Sundance 2021, becoming the first film in the history of the festival to succeed.

The action takes place in the village of Krusha-e-Madhe seven years after the Kosovo war, the story of the mother of two children Yulka Gashi, Fakhrie, whose beloved husband was abducted during the conflict and who has since remained suspended, not knowing his exact fate. She was left to care for her elderly father-in-law and invalid Haji (Chun Laichi); although she sends him to sell small quantities of homemade honey at the local market, he is not very good at it, while public expectations regarding the woman’s place prevent Fahrie from working on her own. Instead, her family is expected to sit in “respected” poverty until she wants to remarry.

When a local women’s group offers Fahri free driving lessons, she ignores her own doubts as well as her rejection of her community and takes this opportunity. After she gets a car, our heroine travels to the capital Pristina, where she makes a deal with a supermarket manager to produce and sell ajvar (a condiment made from sweet bell peppers), encouraging her peers to join her. seek.

Using manual cinematography, Basoli keeps close to his esteemed protagonist, and Gashi rewards her with a performance of great subtlety and conviction. If the cracks in Fakhrie’s self-control can break her heart, it is very gratifying to watch this faded character come back to life through her achievements, and see the sense of solidarity and purposefulness that grows among rural women. Beehive provides a window into a world far from Western expectations of equality, and is a wonderful tribute to those who dare to go against the grain, regardless of personal value.

The Hive screening takes place as part of the Glasgow Film Festival at GFT, Thursday, March 3, 8:45 p.m., and Friday, March 4, 1 p.m .; also available online at Glasgow Film At Home, Friday, 4-Monday, March 7; in the country’s cinemas from Friday, March 18.

The Beehive Review – Blerta Başoli’s drama, which won the Sundance in Kosovo, brings an inspiring true life story to the Glasgow Film Festival

Source link The Beehive Review – Blerta Başoli’s drama, which won the Sundance in Kosovo, brings an inspiring true life story to the Glasgow Film Festival

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