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Review of Batman – Matt Reeves gives some masterful touches for the rebooted Batman, who was let down by his characters

Detective Jeffrey Wright Gordon tries to advise restless crusader Robert Pattinson

Matt Reeves makes some masterful touches for the rebooted Batman, who was let down by his characters

From the beginning, Batman was tied to noir. Director Matt Reeves and co-author Peter Craig are strongly inclined to the genre with a tense crime thriller that is slowly losing momentum over the nearly three-hour show. Robert Pattinson’s twist as Bruce Wayne is strikingly different from the images in previous films. He’s a goth / granger whose theme is ‘Something in The Way’ by Nirvana, and his casual 90s clothes are just black t-shirts and jeans. In a bat suit he is vulnerable and indecisive, quietly hiding in the shadows but still tough against criminals.

The brutal opening film presents a sinister serial killer who is stunningly emerging from the darkness hidden behind a gas mask. He leaves a mystery addressed to Batman at the crime scene, and soon Detective James Gordon (Jeffrey Wright) teams up with a crusader in a cloak to solve the case. In the style of David Fincher Sevenoccasionally turning in Saw territories developed deadly traps are used in the assassinations of key statesmen. Meanwhile, Batman explores an exclusive nightclub run by gangsters Penguin (Colin Farrell works great with prosthetics) and Carmine Falcone (John Turtura) with the help of Catwoman / Celine Kyle (Zoe Kravitz).

There’s an impressive introduction to Batman’s fighting skills, which takes place in the subway and is reminiscent of Walter Hill’s game Warriors where Batman comes to the rescue of an Asian stuffed with a gang as a result of an initiation attack. It is kinetically directed and visually compelling in analyzing the pack mentality and the courage needed to confront it.

Batman’s story and Gotham’s Aerosol Town Hall fill the audience with the film’s main theme as fear is used as a tool to dismantle democracy, literally expressing it. In this regard, Batman reflects reality by painting an ugly picture of political corruption and the toxic behavior of men in the digital age. Paul Dan plays Reddler in the role of a desperately sad instigator who gathers a small angry crowd on social media; it is a devoted and disturbing performance. Kravitz in the role of the Catwoman gets the inappropriate productive role of a fatal woman and very few bites. However, her costume is admirable, with a cropped but sharp leather bondage-style suit.

Visually, Reeves nods at 1940s gangster films and contemporary directors such as Fincher and Michael Mann, but this is a distraction from time to time. The film is at its best if it departs from this to play with camera angles in unexpected and intriguing ways. Next to Michael Jackin’s masterful, operatic score, filled with fear and threatening repetitions of Schubert’s “Ave Maria,” there are moments of sublime innovation. The capable cast performs its roles with splendor, but some of the power of the film is lost with some unconvincing twists of the story and a few characters who feel stale.

Batman has been in theaters since Friday, March 4th.

Review of Batman – Matt Reeves gives some masterful touches for the rebooted Batman, who was let down by his characters

Source link Review of Batman – Matt Reeves gives some masterful touches for the rebooted Batman, who was let down by his characters

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